AMNR vs AMeTFT vs AMHET

Schematic of an amorphous metal non-linear resistor (AMNR) device.

Schematic of an amorphous metal non-linear resistor (AMNR) device.

Schematic of an amorphous metal thin-film transistor (AMeTFT) device.

Schematic of an amorphous metal thin-film transistor (AMeTFT) device.

Schematic of an amorphous metal hot electron transistor (AMHET) device.

Schematic of an amorphous metal hot electron transistor (AMHET) device.

All of the amorphous metal thin-film electronic devices that we have share one main commonality: they all leverage the smoothness of amorphous metals to enable thin high-K dielectrics.

In the case of AMNR and AMHET, the dielectric serves as a quantum tunnel barrier that regulates at what electric field electrons can move (i.e. tunnel) from one electrode to the other. For AMeTFT the dielectric effectively serves as a pool of electrons. By thinning the dielectric its capacitance actually goes up, enabling it to carry more charge and turn on faster. There is no quantum tunneling involved though.

AMNR are two-terminal “diode-like” devices, whereas AMeTFT and AMHET are both transistor devices with three terminals. AMHET however are a bit different than thin-film transistors, like the AMeTFT. AMHET are unipolar minority carrier transistors, where the minority carrier is hot electrons and the majority carrier is cold electrons. Cold electrons are those with energy equal to the Fermi level of the base metal, and hot electrons are those with energy above this. The hot electrons are generated by tunneling across the high-K dielectric and their flow to the collector electrode is regulated by the collector-base barrier and electric field.

BackgroundSean Muir