Scheduled creativity means you don't have to be "creative" to create

Charles Thomas "Chuck" Close is an American painter, artist and photographer. He makes massive-scale photo-realistic portraits. Wikimedia.

Charles Thomas "Chuck" Close is an American painter, artist and photographer. He makes massive-scale photo-realistic portraits. Wikimedia.

“Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work.”

- Charles Thomas "Chuck" Close

It is is well worn topic in some circles. Some talk of scheduling creativity (and here), others demand it, and others say to nurture it. Often the “creative types” are writers or artists, like Chuck Close.

So does this concept really apply to start-ups?

The very idea of a start-up is to work with a team of people to create new solutions to old problems on a schedule.

We believe that creativity is something that can and should be scheduled.

Our mission, to become the recognized leader of the evolution beyond semiconductors requires creativity, constantly. As a display industry analyst recently wrote, we must “innovate or die”.

Carl Richards, creator of the Behavior Gap podcast (referenced above), said, “Don’t wait around for creativity to strike. Strike creativity! Invent an obligation for yourself so you have to be creative on purpose.”

Routines allow our minds to move on to the really interesting stuff and any effort spent trying to decide when or where to work, actually prevents us from doing the creative work that must be done.

So in other words, the power is in the support systems.

To enable people to be creative on a routine basis there must be support systems that help identify the most important tasks and obligate progress towards them.

We believe our success as a start-up has come from developing support systems that let us focus on what is importan: technology innovation.

PerspectivesSean Muir